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Download E-books Treasuring the Gaze: Intimate Vision in Late Eighteenth-Century Eye Miniatures PDF

By Hanneke Grootenboer

The finish of the eighteenth century observed the beginning of a brand new craze in Europe: tiny photos of unmarried eyes that have been exchanged through fanatics or family. Worn as brooches or pendants, those minuscule eyes served an identical emotional want as extra traditional mementoes, similar to lockets containing a coil of a enjoyed one’s hair. the style lasted just a couple of a long time, and by means of the early 1800s eye miniatures had pale into oblivion. Unearthing those graphics in Treasuring the Gaze, Hanneke Grootenboer proposes that the trend for eye miniatures—and their abrupt disappearance—reveals a knot within the unfolding of the heritage of vision.
 
Drawing on Alois Riegl, Jean-Luc Nancy, Marcia Pointon, Melanie Klein, and others, Grootenboer unravels this knot, getting to know formerly unseen styles of taking a look and techniques for displaying. She indicates that eye miniatures painting the subject’s gaze instead of his or her eye, making the recipient of the memento an unique beholder who's without end watched. those valuable images continuously go back the appearance they obtain and, as such, they bring a reciprocal mode of viewing that Grootenboer calls intimate imaginative and prescient. Recounting tales approximately eye miniatures—including the function one performed within the scandalous affair of Mrs. Fitzherbert and the Prince of Wales, a portrait of the captivating eye of Lord Byron, and the loss and longing integrated in crying eye miniatures—Grootenboer exhibits that intimate imaginative and prescient brings the gaze of one other deep into the guts of non-public experience.
 
With a number of interesting imagery from this eccentric and typically forgotten but deeply inner most memento, Treasuring the Gaze presents new insights into the paintings of miniature portray and the style of portraiture.

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